Minutes of July 2021 Meeting

North College Park Community Association
July 8, 2021 – Regular Meeting At the VFW and by Zoom

Attending: At the VFW, President Mary Cook; Jim Miller (College Park Parking Enforcement Director); Lisa Ealley, Carissa Janis, John Krouse, and a College Park Here & Now reporter; Virtual, Vice President Carol Macknis, Secretary Ellen Caswell; Mayor Patrick Wojahn; Councilmembers Maria Mackie, Fazlul Kabir, and Denise Mitchell; Scott Benedict Osborn (Operation Supervisor for Parking); Jerri Jones (Constituent Services Specialist in Tom Dernoga’s office); Judy Blumenthal, Stephanie Butler, Arelis Pérez, Hutchison, and a telephone caller.

Meeting called to order at 7:04 pm..

Officers’ Reports:

President Mary Cook: Cook has had no reply from DPI regarding the bollards on Cherry Hill Road.

Vice President Carol Macknis: (1) The Branchville Fire Department was *ecstatic* that we donated a catered meal. (2) Beltway expansion – vote taken, beltway expansion, I270, and American Legion Bridge portions were not included in planning for area. Means it won’t get federal funding. Governor Hogan will try for another vote this month. He’s still full speed ahead. Mayor Wojahn, who represents the city on the Transportation Planning Board, said that the Board voted to remove the plan to widen the beltway and I270. Governor Hogan has sent a letter threatening to remove other projects the tolls were supposed to support, including the not-yet-funded northern segment of the Baltimore Avenue reconstruction in College Park as well as the i495 interchange to the Greenbelt Metro Station.

Treasurer Jordan Schakner, reported by President Cook: We have $1,118.37 in total for both bank accounts, and another $30 in dues to be added.

Bylaws Amendment:

Following up on the motion from the May meeting, John Krouse read the proposed text:

Section 2: Nominating Committee. The President may appoint a Nominating Committee consisting of two (2), three (3) or four (4) members to make nominations. Any member may nominate another member up to the time of the election when the nominee is added to the ballot as a write-in candidate.

Section 3: Terms and Procedure. All officers shall be elected for a term of one year. The President shall cause ballots to be prepared for the June meeting with the names of all nominated persons, and shall appoint an election committee to count ballots. Elections shall be by secret ballot for each contested office; if an office has only one candidate, a motion from the floor to elect that candidate by acclamation shall be in order. A majority of the votes cast shall be required to elect each officer. Voting shall be open to all members of record and tallied as soon as possible after the ballots are cast. When the ballots for any office do not provide a majority of votes for a candidate, then the names of the two candidates with the most votes for the office shall be immediately entered into a run-off election. The candidate with the majority of votes cast in the run-off election shall be elected.

Section 4: Continuance in Office. In the event that nominees for an office cannot be identified for election at the June meeting, that officer shall continue in office until an election is held. If the election of officers cannot take place in June, the election shall take place at any regular meeting or special meeting in conformance with Article V of these Bylaws.

Vice President Macknis asked why we are specifying two, three, or four members rather than 1 or more. Krouse proposed changing the wording to “consisting of one or more members.” Macknis made the motion, Krouse seconded it, and it was passed unanimously.

Macknis then said that “any regular meeting” is too open-ended. After discussion, Krouse moved that the wording be changed from “the election shall take place at any regular meeting or special meeting” to “the election shall take place at the next regular meeting or special meeting”. Lisa Ealley seconded. The motion passed with one abstention.

The overall motion was then passed with one abstention.

Minutes of the May 13, 2021 NCPCA Meeting: Approved with a typo correction.

Future of the Stone Straw Property:

President Cook has been in contact with Profish again. The Terrapin Development Corporation is wooing them for South College Park. Krouse read Judy Blumenthal’s motion and quotes from the May meeting: “I move that NCPCA write a letter to Prince George’s County Councilmember Tom Dernoga, stating that NCPCA supports the vision of the Greenbelt Metro Area Approved Sector Plan and Sectional Map Amendment, 2001 regarding the former Stone Straw property and adjacent industrial properties in Branchville. NCPCA requests that any future development be designed in conformance with Chapter 14 of the Sector Plan, and that single family infill development be the preferred type of housing, consistent with the adjacent residential zoning of the community.”

Quotes from the Sector Plan:

“North College Park should be preserved as a low-density residential community supporting the Greenbelt station transit neighborhood.”

“Incompatible industrial uses in the southern portion of North College Park (Branchville) should be phased out and the land should be redeveloped with appropriate residential uses. Housing development plans submitted should be evaluated and reviewed for compatibility, appropriateness at a given location and the need for the type of housing”.

“Visual buffers and noise barriers should be provided along the eastern edge of the community to effectively screen the railroad tracks.”

“Infill single-family detached housing on vacant property should relate to the neighborhood’s character and existing structures’ style, setback, roof type, height, scale and proportion.”

“Industrial properties redeveloped to residential uses, other than single-family detached, should be compatible and contribute positively to the integrity and character of the North College Park neighborhood”

Vice President Macknis felt the motion should not limit recipients of the letter to Tom Dernoga. Blumenthal moved it be amended to say “send to appropriate public officials.” Ealley seconded, and the motion was passed with one abstention.

The overall motion was passed unanimously.

5G:

Councilmember Denise Mitchell gave an overview of 5G. The term Smart City comes into play, with faster technology, better infrastructure, access to wireless. It involves deploying small cells that cover smaller areas, with smaller antennas. Benefits include increased use of wireless and faster speed. Downsides include the placement of poles and articulation of right-of-way usage and raise the question of who benefits. In 2018-2019, College Park passed an ordinance, a memorandum of understanding agreement, that vendors must make an application, vetted by the city attorney, then a more detailed application before Mayor and Council. We’ve recently heard that a 5G antenna may be placed on Cherry Hill Road, which is a county road and thus bypasses the city ordinance. Councilmembers Mitchell and Mackie and President Cook met with Verizon, who made it seem like it’s a done deal. Mitchell proposes a letter to Mayor and Council asking for a work session and more discussion. Councilmember Kabir linked to a blog post with a map of possible locations. https://www.kabircares.org/college-park-may-get-5g-wireless-in-2021/. They’re planning 38 antennas across College Park; they will be smaller, about 15 feet tall, some on Pepco poles. Different carriers use different technology and different frequency bands. He supports further discussion. Mitchell says the Maryland Municipal League provided a template that was used to create the right-of-way lease agreement. Macknis requested that this information be consolidated, which Cook agreed to do.

License Plate Recognition (LPR) System:

College Park Parking Enforcement Director Jim Miller described College Park’s new parking permit system. The Council removed the permit fees but vehicles still need to be registered vehicle in areas with permits. No hang tag is needed. A virtual permit is registered in the database; you can register by mail, in person, or online. Visitor passes are still physical and are put on the dashboard. LPR vehicles recognize all license plates and give audible sounds indicating whether the vehicle is registered. There is a YouTube video that demonstrates the use of the equipment.

Operation Supervisor for Parking Scott Benedict Osborn provided a visual of what the new parking enforcement equipment looks like and how it operates. Left- and right-hand cameras are mounted on the LPR car and read the license plates as the car goes by. The system beeps when it recognizes a car or an alert if a vehicle is not recognized as having a permit for that location. When alerted, the parking officer gets out of vehicle to check for a visitor permit or an incorrect reading of the license plate. The system records the vehicle’s geolocation and alerts on a second pass if the vehicle is in a spot longer than allowed. The system is now fully operational.

Residents can’t tell whether vehicles have permits; if you see it on a regular basis and it’s not being ticketed, it has a permit. A permit for a particular zone is only valid in that zone. If you suspect a car is not legally there, let the parking enforcement people know. Miller says this system is much more efficient and effective than ever before.

Nominating Committee:

Arelis Pérez and Lisa Ealley volunteered to serve. If needed, there is online voting software available.>/p?

Future Agenda Items:

Some proposed items are: (1) a visit from UMD President Darryll J. Pines for October or November; (2) Information on what the county is doing regarding police reform; (3) A presentation by code enforcement; (4) and a Hollywood Streetscape update.

Announcements:

The Hollywood Dog Park ribbon cutting is scheduled for the following Friday.

Councilmember Mackie hopes people come to dog park ribbon cutting. There are just two Council meetings in July.

Councilmember Mitchell will provide a flyer for the International Diversity Cookbook of favorite recipes, providing a cultural history.

Mayor Wojahn says (1) they haven’t received relief funds but should in the next couple of weeks and hope to set up relief program. (2) Parking is still free evenings and weekends at the city garage downtown, as is Lot 11. (3) They are still taking nominations for the Jack Perry Award, a deserving resident who goes above and beyond in serving the College Park community, until July 15.

Vice President Macknis says the Community Police meeting is now the Community Public Safety discussion, coordinated by the city and covering all of the city. Time and date are still 7:30 pm on the second Monday of each month on Zoom.

Councilmember Kabir says (1) the main topic at the next Public Safety Meeting is code enforcement. (2) He recognizes Councilmember Mitchell as the next President-Elect of Maryland Municipal League and Mayor Wojahn as a member of the Board of Directors.

 

President Cook thanked the VFW for hosting.

Pérez moved to adjourn, Ealley seconded, and the meeting adjourned at 8:45 pm.

Agenda – September 9, 2021

NCPCA – North College Park Community Association
Agenda of Regular In-person/Virtual Meeting
In-person Location: VFW, 5051 Branchville Rd, College Park
Thursday, September 9, 20217:00-9:00 pm.

Agenda Times & Topics are subject to change.

7:00  Welcome & Review of procedures.

7:05  NCPCA officers’ reports & approval of July Minutes.

7:15  Elections – all candidates will be given two minutes to who they are and why they are running for office. (Elections will be held via Election Buddy, an online tool).

7:30  County-wide Map Amendment review (Part of the Zoning Rewrite process) by a M-NCPPC representative.

8:00  Presentation of County-wide Map Amendment process by Greg Smith

8:20  Discussion of NCPCA letter regarding map amendment to be sent to County, City & State officials and other next steps.

8:30  College Park Here & Now.

8:45  New Business & Future Agenda Items.

8:55  Member and guest announcements (if time permits) (limited to 2 minutes per person).

September 2021 Meeting Zoom Information

Zoom Information: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6185490686

Meeting ID:   618 549 0686

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College Park 2021 Elections

College Park 2021 Elections

Sunday, November 7, 2021

The City of College Park will hold its 2021 elections on Sunday, November 7, 2021, from 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. at the College Park Community Center, 5051 Pierce Avenue, College Park.  The Mayor and all Councilmembers will be elected this fall.

  • New this year: Registered voters will receive applications for absentee ballots in September.  Return your application before October 26 to receive a ballot in the mail.
  • Voter Registration: If you have moved or changed your name since the last time you voted, update your voter registration by October 10, 2021.

For detailed information abut the upcoming city elections, please see: https://www.collegeparkmd.gov/elections.

College Park National Night Out – August 3, 2021 (times vary with location)

College Park National Night Out
August 3, 2021 (times vary with location)

National Night Out (NNO) is a community-police partnership that provides a unique opportunity for residents to increase awareness about crime prevention and safety, get to know their neighbors, and meet local law enforcement and other public safety officers.

In acknowledgement and support of National Night Out, please turn on your porch or lamp-post lights from dusk to midnight on August 3!

Activities in College Park will be held in five locations:

  • Berwyn Neighborhood Park (5:30 pm-8:00 pm)
  • College Park Woods Park (6:30 pm-8:00 pm)
  • Lakeland Community Park (6:00 pm-8:30 pm)
  • Cherry Hill Neighborhood Park (7:00 pm-8:30 pm)
  • Duvall Field (7:00 pm-8:30 pm)

For details see: https://www.collegeparkmd.gov/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=268

College Park Day – CANCELLED

Unfortunately the City has decided to CANCEL
the 2021 College Park Day.

 

Hopefully this event will be able to be held in 2022.

.

Agenda – July 8, 2021

REVISED AGENDA & ZOOM MEETING INFORMATION

NCPCA – North College Park Community Association
Draft Agenda of Regular In-person/Virtual Meeting
July 8, 2021, 7:00 pm

Location: VFW, 5051 Branchville Rd, College Park

* * * NOTE: Change in TIME and the LOCATION of In-person meeting. * * *

Zoom Information:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6185490686
Meeting ID: 618 549 0686
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,6185490686# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,6185490686# US (Chicago)

Agenda Times & Topics are subject to change.

7:00  Welcome & Review of procedures.

7:05   NCPCA officers’ reports & approval of May minutes.

Draft Minutes of the May 13 NCPCA Meeting

7:15   Vote on by-laws referencing nominations and elections (see proposed and original texts below – Item #1).

7:25   Future of Stone Straw Property – discussion of motion made last month (see below – Item #2).

7:35   5G Tower coming to your neighborhood – Councilmember Denise Mitchell

7:55   Break — snacks provided.

8:05   Parking Enforcement – demonstration of new monitoring equipment by Parking Enforcement Director, Jim Miller.

8:30   New Business & Future Agenda Items.

8:40   Member and Guest Announcements.

8:50   Clean up room.

Item #1:

Motion by John Krouse at the 5-13-21 meeting to change the bylaws — for ratification at the 7-8-21 meeting.

Proposed Text:

Section 2: Nominating Committee.  The President may appoint a Nominating Committee consisting of two (2), three (3) or four (4) members to make nominations.  Any member may nominate another member up to the time of the election when the nominee is added to the ballot as a write-in candidate.

Section 3: Term and Procedure.  All officers shall be elected for a term of one year.  The President shall cause ballots to be prepared for the June meeting with the names of all nominated persons, and shall appoint an election committee to count ballots.  Elections shall be by secret ballot for each contested office; if an office has only one candidate, a motion from the floor to elect that candidate by acclamation shall be in order.  A majority of the votes cast shall be required to elect each officer.  Voting shall be open to all members of record and tallied as soon as possible after the ballots are cast.  When the ballots for any office do not provide a majority of votes for a candidate, then the names of the two candidates with the most votes for the office shall be immediately entered into a run-off election.  The candidate with the majority of votes cast in the run-off election shall be elected.

Section 4: Continuance in Office.  In the event that nominees for an office cannot be identified for election at the June meeting, that officer shall continue in office until an election is held.  If the election of officers cannot take place in June, the election shall take place at any regular meeting or special meeting in conformance with Article V of these Bylaws.

Original Text:

Section 2: Nominating Committee.  No later than the April meeting the President shall appoint a Nominating Committee consisting of three (3) members to make nominations.

Section 3: Term and Procedure.  All officers shall be elected for a term of one year.  The President shall cause ballots to be prepared for the June meeting with the names of all persons duly nominated at the May meeting, and shall appoint an election committee to count ballots at the June meeting. Elections shall be by secret ballot for each contested office; if an office has only one candidate, a motion from the floor to elect that candidate by acclamation shall be in order.  A majority of the votes cast shall be required to elect each officer.  Voting at the June meeting for election of officers shall be open to all members of record and tallied as soon as possible after the ballots are cast.  When the ballots for any office do not provide a majority of votes for a candidate, then the names of the two candidates with the most votes for the office shall be immediately entered into a run-off election.  The candidate with the majority of votes cast in the run-off election shall be elected.

Section 4: Continuance in Office.  In the event that nominees for an office cannot be identified for election at the June meeting, that officer shall continue in office until such time as sufficient nominees are identified and an election is held.  If the election of officers cannot take place at the June meeting, the election shall take place at the next scheduled meeting at which sufficient nominees exist for election.

To read NCPCA’s complete by-laws, visit myncpca.org (“Legal” tab).

Item #2:

Motion by Judy Blumenthal at the 5-13-21 meeting regarding the Stone Property

Regarding the Stone property, I move that NCPCA write a letter to Prince George’s County Councilmember Tom Dernoga, stating that NCPCA supports the vision of the Greenbelt Metro Area Approved Sector Plan and Sectional Map Amendment of 2001 regarding the former Stone Straw property and adjacent industrial properties in Branchville.  NCPCA requests that any future development be designed in conformance with Chapter 14 of the Sector Plan, and that single family infill development be the preferred type of housing, consistent with the adjacent residential zoning of the community.

During discussion, it was suggested that the letter also be sent to the chair of the county council, the county executive, and our two at-large council members.

After discussion, it was agreed to table this motion until the next meeting.

Minutes of May 2021 Meeting

North College Park Community Association
May 13, 2021 – Regular Meeting by Zoom

Attending: President Mary Cook, Vice President Carol Macknis, Secretary Ellen Caswell; Councilmembers Kate Kennedy, Maria Mackie, and Denise Mitchell; Judy Blumenthal, Dawn Budd, Kelvin Budd, Lisa Ealley, Carissa Janis, Mary King, John Krouse, Arelis Pérez, and David Turcios, and from the 21st District Delegation, Senator Jim Rosapepe, Delegates Joseline Peña-Melnyk and Mary Lehman, and new member of the Community Liaison Staff Denise Valladares.

Meeting called to order at 7:32 pm..

Officers’ Reports:

President Mary Cook: (1) NCPCA provided food from Cinder BBQ, and baking from President Cook, for the Branchville Fire Department interns, to much appreciation. (2) Parks and Planning are supposed to plant trees in Cherry Hill Park. As planned, they would hide basketball court and picnic tables. Maria Mackie and President Cook are working with them on this and other issues.

Vice President Carol Macknis: (1) MDOT is not presently looking at the beltway expansion high-occupancy lanes in Prince George’s County. A supplemental DEIS will be issued, probably sometime in the summer. (2) Citizens Against Beltway Expansion has a petition opposing Maglev. VP Macknis will send a link to everyone. (3) Using Paypal for dues is confusing. There are a number of questions to answer to set this up. She encourages people to mail their dues. (4) To make change to bylaws, we need to get the wording to members at least five days before the meeting where they’re voted on.

Treasurer Jordan Schakner, via May 18 email: We have $1,018.26 in the SECU account..

Minutes of the April 8, 2021 NCPCA Meeting: The spelling of Finmarc having been corrected, Arelis Pérez moved to approve, Judy Blumenthal seconded, and the motion passed.

Mansionization Presentation: Judy Blumenthal made the following motion, which Arelis Pérez seconded:

I move that NCPCA write a letter to the Mayor and City Council, to request the City Council to require representatives of Metropolitan to meet with NCPCA before the City takes any position or makes any recommendations regarding future changes to the approved site plan.

Discussion: The developers of the Metropolitan, on Cherokee Street, want to reduce parking spaces and increase the number and change the type of the units, which is against covenant. Blumenthal would like to be proactive this time and have them talk to us before anything’s done. According to Pérez, their attorneys are very successful in zoning and variance. Mary King says we need to provide more parking somewhere. The motion was brought to a vote and passed. Blumenthal will write the letter and provide a copy for the website.

Stone Property Presentation: Judy Blumenthal provided some background of possible development that has been discussed and quoted relevant clauses from the Greenbelt Metro sector plan (sector plan link: http://mncppcapps.org/planning/publications/BookDetail.cfm?item_id=29&Category_id=1).

Blumenthal made the following motion; Pérez seconded:

Regarding the Stone property, I move that NCPCA write a letter to Prince George’s County Councilmember Tom Dernoga, stating that NCPCA supports the vision of the Greenbelt Metro Area Approved Sector Plan and Sectional Map Amendment of 2001 regarding the former Stone Straw property and adjacent industrial properties in Branchville. NCPCA requests that any future development be designed in conformance with Chapter 14 of the Sector Plan, and that single family infill development be the preferred type of housing, consistent with the adjacent residential zoning of the community.

Discussion: Councilmember Mitchell and VP Macknis suggested the letter also be sent to the chair of the county council, the county executive, and our two at-large county councilmembers. Cook and Lisa Ealley suggest tabling until the next meeting to get more people involved and to have time to digest. There are a lot of implications here. There’s a lot going on here; we could involve the city’s and county’s economic development people and other stakeholders as well. Blumenthal wants us to be proactive – to lead – rather than reactive.

Lisa Ealley moved to table the motion; Pérez seconded. The motion passed.

The 21st District Delegation Update: Senator Rosapepe introduced Denise Valladeres, the new member of the community liaison staff. Delegate Peña-Melnyk focuses on health care and Delegate Lehman on environmental issues. The state, county, and city received a lot of federal aid; Delegate Ben Barnes spearheaded the financial aspect. Locally, College Park Meals on Wheels received $250K for equipment, Attick Towers received $2M for rehab, and Al Huda’s charitable arm received $250K. More money is available for city highway aid and other local projects. Economic aid included funds to support the unemployment system; College Park received $16M; the school system $275M; and the county $3.5B. $1B is toward recapitalizing the unemployment trust fund. The economy is coming back, with jobs transitioning from fields like hospitality to teleworking, IT, delivery/warehousing, and healthcare.

Delegate Peña-Melnyk is busy with health-related committees. Prince George’s County has the highest number of Covid cases, highlighting the health disparities in black and brown communities. Science and public health need to work together. Recent bills include House Bill 836 – testing, contact tracing, the Vaccination Act of 2021; House bill 123, which preserves telehealth access, especially important for rural communities; a bill that requires implicit bias training for all healthcare workers; a bill to create health equity commission framework in all departments in the state of Maryland; a difficult bill regarding medical debt protection. This session focused a lot on mental health. Public health had better funding this session. She thanked us for the opportunity to serve.

Delegate Lehman began on the health care front, with a shout out to Pérez regarding Attick Towers, which is more rundown. The new manager is wonderful. HUD wants out of this business. We’re thrilled to get the good down payment of $2M. Lehman put forward a nursing home visitation bill, where in a health emergency, families can work with nursing homes who have to develop guidelines to allow compassionate care visits. On the environmental front, the House Environment Transportation Committee addresses water quality, animals, fish, and wildlife environment and so on. House Bill 18 guarantees access to legal counsel; low-income people have access to counsel through Maryland Legal Services Corporation, which provides grants nonprofits providing pro bono services. Ethics were hotly debated. The Plastic Bag Reduction Act passed the house but not the senate, at least this year. The Climate Solutions Now Act was too comprehensive, should have been three or four smaller bills. Three separate bills did pass: (1) Maryland will be planting 5 million trees over the next 10 years, half a million in urban areas. (2) After 2025 Maryland can only purchase electric buses. (3) Environmental Justice Commission Bill will look at new laws and impact on low-income communities/communities of color.

Questions and Answers:

(1) Attick Towers is a HUD building, run by the Housing Authority of the City of College Park, with no modernization since it went up in 1967. HUD wants the Housing Authority to sell to a nonprofit. There’s barely enough funding to pay the bills. $2M was great, hope to add more. Enough property to build a second building. Given need for affordable senior housing, why not? The new executive director created a nonprofit, College Park Affordable Housing Coalition. Exciting things are coming forth.

(2) Lisa Ealley would like to work with Peña-Melnyk on a mental health bill.

(3) Maryland will probably be next to legalize marijuana, probably after the election year. Medical cannabis is allowed in Maryland; marijuana was decriminalized several years ago.

(4) Sports betting has passed in Maryland but is not yet implemented; hoped to be by fall.

(5) House Bill 114 is a transit grant funding bill for businesses along the Purple Line in Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties that are adversely impacted during construction.

Elections: There was extensive discussion, largely between VP Macknis and John Krouse, of existing bylaws as they pertain to elections and what needs to happen to change the bylaws. Cook proposed we hold the election in September. See New Business.

Dogs Good, Poop Bad: Councilmember Kennedy showed sample posters for feedback on what works best to encourage scooping dog poop, which has disease-causing bacteria that goes into our watersheds. Kennedy and Mackie are both on the Chesapeake Bay Policy Committee. The posters that worked best are simpler, less wordy, with cute dogs and good puns. Other languages should be used, not just English and Spanish. We discussed dog parks, including the new one, and who can use it/who finances it.

At 9:30, P‚rez moved we extend the meeting; Krouse seconded; the motion passed.

New Business: Krouse moves to change portions of the bylaws related to elections; Pérez seconded. The motion will be discussed during the next meeting. We can send separately to the membership.

The proposed text:

Section 2: Nominating Committee. The President may appoint a Nominating Committee consisting of two (2), three (3) or four (4) members to make nominations. Any member may nominate another member up to the time of the election when the nominee is added to the ballot as a write-in candidate.

Section 3: Term and Procedure. All officers shall be elected for a term of one year. The President shall cause ballots to be prepared for the June meeting with the names of all nominated persons, and shall appoint an election committee to count ballots. Elections shall be by secret ballot for each contested office; if an office has only one candidate, a motion from the floor to elect that candidate by acclamation shall be in order. A majority of the votes cast shall be required to elect each officer. Voting shall be open to all members of record and tallied as soon as possible after the ballots are cast. When the ballots for any office do not provide a majority of votes for a candidate, then the names of the two candidates with the most votes for the office shall be immediately entered into a run-off election. The candidate with the majority of votes cast in the run-off election shall be elected.

Section 4: Continuance in Office. In the event that nominees for an office cannot be identified for election at the June meeting, that officer shall continue in office until an election is held. If the election of officers cannot take place in June, the election shall take place at any regular meeting or special meeting in conformance with Article V of these Bylaws.

Future Agenda Items: Pérez suggests (1) Come back to Stone Straw property. (2) Reinvite Parking Enforcement Officer Jim Miller. (3) New City Manager Natasha F. Hampton. (4) New UMD President Daryl J. Pines. Macknis suggests we reschedule Councilmember Mitchell’s talk on the 5G tower coming to our neighborhood.

Meeting adjourned at 9:36 pm. Pérez moved, Macknis seconded, and the motion passed.

Agenda – May 13,2021

NCPCA – North College Park Community Association
Agenda of Regular Virtual Meeting
May 13, 2021, 7:30 pm

Agenda Times & Topics are subject to change.

7:30  Welcome & Review of procedures.

7:35   NCPCA officers’ reports & approval of April minutes.

Draft Minutes – April 8, 2021

7:40   Update by Mansionization Committee.

7:50   Elections in June.

8:05   District 21 legislative update.

8:35   5G Tower coming to your neighborhood – Councilmember Denise Mitchell.

9:00   Update on the Dog Park and picking up after your dog – Councilmember Kennedy.

9:15   Guests & Officials Announcements (limited to 2 minutes each).

9:25   New Business & Future Agenda Items.

Minutes of April 2021 Meeting

North College Park Community Association
April 8, 2021 – Regular Meeting by Zoom

Attending: President Mary Cook, Vice President Carol Macknis, Secretary Ellen Caswell; Mayor Patrick Wojahn, Councilmembers Fazlul Kabir, Kate Kennedy, and Denise Mitchell; Dawn Budd, Kelvin Budd, Judy Blumenthal, John Krouse, Lisa Ealley, Mary King, Jessica Sim, Matt Sim; and from the Maryland Coalition for Responsible Transit: Pat Jackman and Susan McCutchen.

Meeting called to order at 7:32 pm.

Agenda: Vice President Macknis moved that the NCPCA elections be added to the Agenda. Ellen Caswell seconded and the motion was passed.

Officers’ Reports:

President Mary Cook: The coalition of North Prince George’s County community associations is meeting every couple of weeks for now. The group focuses on a few issues at a time, currently trash and parking enforcement. Working with the county is especially challenging.

Treasurer Jordan Schakner, via email: We have $1,377.39 in the bank, and $40 in dues were deposited.

Vice President Carol Macknis: (1) Needs to be reimbursed $13 for a website invoice. (2) Beltway expansion: We’re not initially very impacted; I270 is affected first. Congressman Anthony Brown opposes it and has been talking to Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg, possibly suggesting we’ve got to slow down the effort. There may be some light at the end of the tunnel.

Secretary Ellen Caswel: The Cherry Hill bollards have been removed. President Cook says the Department of Public Works & Transportation is supposed to meet with residents before they put in the planned median.

Minutes of the March 11, 2021 NCPCA Meeting: VP Macknis had a correction; residents are responsible for shoveling snow and making sure greenery doesn’t impact the sidewalks, not repairing them. This was tabled until later in the meeting.

SCMaglev Presentation:

Pat Jackman and Susan McCutchen from the Maryland Coalition for Responsible Transit (MCRT) www.mcrt-action.org. The MCRT’s mission is to assess transit projects for equity, for environmental impact, and social viability. The number one project right now is the Superconducting Maglev (SCMaglev), a high-speed ground-based passenger transportation system that’s being tested in Japan. The Baltimore-Washington SCMaglev Project is a $16 Billion project that would operate a train that hovers above metal tracks using a levitation system powered by magnets. The train would reach over 300 mph to carry passengers between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail (BWRR) is a private American company developing the project. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) awarded the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) a $27.8 million dollar grant to prepare the Environmental Impact Statement. The presentation included route information and project infrastructure. MCRT is aligned with Citizens Against the SC Maglev, both of which are working on Draft Environmental Impact Statement, which is out for commenting. They’re looking at safety concerns, environment, road congestion, and other issues. The overall construction of the project is estimated 7 years, 3-4 years in our area. MCRT has extensive information refuting claims about the SCMaglev, including a 44-page PDF with a searchable table of contents.

There followed discussion that focused on how the SCMaglev would have little benefit for local transportation, and that travel on each end would involve local transportation.

Vice President Macknis moved that NCPCA send a letter to the SCMaglev Project opposing the project, supporting the No Build Option, and that we include in our letter some of the reasons for our objections. Judy Blumenthal seconded and the motion passed with one abstention.

Mayor Wojahn was asked about the city’s stance, and reported that the City Council has taken a position in support of some bills before the General Assembly regarding Maglev. Maglev discussion is on the April 13 agenda.

Vice President Macknis made a second motion: Based on information from County Councilmember Glaros, she moved that NCPCA send a letter to each of our federal representatives stating there should be no federal funding for maglev. There was discussion of a second part of the motion suggesting support for capital rails, but after discussion this was removed. Ellen Caswell seconded, and it was passed with one abstention. President Cook will draft the letter.

Mansionization: Judy Blumenthal reported on recent activity. We need to be more knowledgeable about covenants and agreements, which overlap with the zoning changes; the city’s planning director, Terry Schum, has provided information. The McMansion committee, originally established to prevent another multimillion dollar house, takes on a whole different dimension. The linchpin that holds everything together is the zoning.

Hollywood Streetscape: Councilmember Kabir expressed excitement that after 12 years we had the vote for construction approval. We should see real changes in early May along Rhode Island Avenue. There will be some traffic impact, including lane closures but not road closures, and there will be changes in traffic pattern. A realistic completion date is very early next year.

Dog Park: Councilmember Kennedy discussed the Dog Park, which should be finished in the next month or so, to open in June by Davis Hall. There are separate sections for big and small dogs, running water, a wood mulch surface, and agility play areas. Cost is about $350,000. Matt Sim asked about the infrastructure projects near the dog park, including drainage and new power lines. Mayor Wojahn said the powerlines are Pepco infrastructure. The county surprised the city by requiring drainage.

Stone Straw Property:

Mayor Wojahn held a meeting that many of us attended; people were very concerned about the traffic patterns. There’s nothing written in stone yet. There are zoning restrictions, so if the current owners were to want to change it to something else they would have to get Councilmember Dernoga to do a text amendment.

Judy Blumenthal says north College Park doesn’t want a housing development. She would like to meet with Finmarc (current owners) or Profish (who was interested but is no longer involved) to find out what is happening. There was discussion of why there is heavy digging happening, with varying explanations. Lisa Ealley suggests that if the property stays commercial a metro shuttle would help mitigate traffic.

Dr. Blumenthal moved that we try to initiate a chat with Finmarc and Profish at different times, 30 minutes each, just to see if we can explain to them who we are and they can provide a little bit more information. VP Macknis seconded and the motion passed.

The Parking Enforcement presentation was moved off the table because Parking Enforcement Director Jim Miller was unable to attend.

Elections:

We discussed whether to hold elections in June, while still in Covid, or possibly in face to face in September. We may be able to have more people able to be involved by then, even if we need to be at a park or equivalent. The bylaws indicate we can have meetings that are not formal without having to hold an election. Dr. Blumenthal would like to continue to meet, as we have momentum and so many issues. John Krouse suggested maybe it’s time to change the bylaws about picking the date. It’s proposed we introduce any changes in May so they can be voted on in June. Whenever the election is held, we will need to have dues-paid members.

Minutes, part 2: Dawn Budd provided the following amendment: “Residents are responsible to keep the sidewalk areas free of trash, snow, and other debris to insure they are passable at all times. Any structural issues should be reported to the city for repairs are their responsibility.” John Krouse moved that we amend the minutes to reflect the text, Ellen Caswell seconded, and the motion passed.

Announcements:

Councilmember Kennedy: (1) She will do a short presentation with Councilmember Maria Mackie, probably next month, about dog poo in the neighborhoods. (2) If anyone hasn’t gotten vaccine, sign up, put Greenbelt Station as top (with state). Mayor Wojahn provided a link: https://onestop.md.gov/preregistration.

Councilmember Kabir: (1) The following Saturday is a big day: community cleanup, bring bulk trash to Davis Hall. Paint can be disposed of Davis Hall at $5/can. A community cleanup by a lot of organizations is coming up the succeeding Saturday. (2) The monthly community police meeting topic for the following Monday (April 10) is loud noise in the community.

Mayor Wojahn: (1) The city is in its budget process; they still need to know how much will come from the American Rescue Plan, which will help support infrastructure. The amount is likely significant, possibly $15M over two years. (2) The Budget Hearing will be May 11 at the regular council meeting. (3) The Mayor is part of an effort looking at the University of Maryland police practices. A community survey of people who interact with the UMD police closes April 17.

John Krouse moved to adjourn. It passed at 9:14 pm.